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showing posts tagged with 'debian'
 
by lunarg on June 8th 2017, at 13:59
nginx provides packages for Debian in their own repository, allowing you to install the most recent version rather than the older versions provided through the main repositories.

Add these lines to /etc/apt/sources.list:

deb http://nginx.org/packages/mainline/debian/ jessie nginxdeb-src http://nginx.org/packages/mainline/debian/ jessie nginx

Change jessie to wheezy if you are still on Debian 7 "Wheezy".

Download and add nginx's public key:

wget http://nginx.org/packages/keys/nginx_signing.key && cat nginx_signing.key | apt-key add -

Update the package list and then install nginx:

apt-get updateapt-get install nginx

By default, the latest version of nginx will be ins  ...
by lunarg on April 26th 2017, at 16:50

Although Debian 7 "Wheezy" (release info) has been superseded by newer releases, it still benefits from Long Term Support (LTS) until end of May 2018. In case of disaster recovery, it may still be useful to download Debian 7 install images (ISO). They can be found here:

Installing Debian 7.11

by lunarg on January 18th 2016, at 15:10
Installing the Open Monitor Distribution (OMD) is actually pretty straight forward on Debian. Consol Labs provides a OMD repository from which the latest version of OMD can be installed, providing both a stable and testing branch.

First and foremost, you need to have a Debian/Ubuntu system running, and it needs to be connected to the internet.

In order to add the repository, you need to import the GPG security key in order to trust the repository:

gpg --keyserver keys.gnupg.net --recv-keys F8C1CA08A57B9ED7gpg --armor --export F8C1CA08A57B9ED7 | apt-key add -

Next, add the repository to your sources.list. For Debian 8.0 "Jessie", this would be something like this:

echo 'deb htt  ...
by lunarg on June 17th 2015, at 10:34
Linux distros with a 3.x kernel running on virtualized hardware (e.g. pvscsi on VMware) may ever so often spit out the following error:

$ dmesg | grep "WRITE SAME"
kernel: sda2: WRITE SAME failed. Manually zeroing.

This is because the disk driver (in our case: the VMware paravirtual driver) does not support the WRITE SAME SCSI command, resulting in this message.

While this poses no problem for the system at all, you may want to get rid of these messages, which is done by disabling the use of the WRITE SAME command. This can be done through a bit of configuration. Most modern systems have systemd on board which can be used for this, but in case your system doesn't, there's also a  ...
by lunarg on June 12th 2015, at 15:55

You can efficiently change the console fonts, character sets and keymaps through the following command:

sudo dpkg-reconfigure console-setup

The configuration is stored in the file /etc/default/console-setup, and can be edited by hand as well.

The changes are effective for all virtual consoles after reboot. To apply the change for the current console, run:

setupcon

To prevent changing the console font completely (i.e. native system/BIOS font will be used), set the font to "do not change".
The equivalent in the config file is:

FONTFACE=""
FONTSIZE=""
by lunarg on October 20th 2010, at 11:57
Debian has introduced incremental updating of package lists. While in theory, this is a great feature, it is not always practical.

Incremental updates enable to download less data by fetching only the differences between the previous versions of the list. This results in significant savings concerning the amount of downloaded data.
The unfortunate downside is that a whole lot more fetches need to be done as each incremental update requires a server request. This becomes apparent when you don't often download package list updates, and there are suddenly a whole number of files waiting to be downloaded. The overhead of requesting each incremental slice separately causes the update to take mor  ...
by lunarg on April 28th 2007, at 00:37
If you happen to have keyboard trouble when you SSH with PuTTY to a Debian system, you might want to read on.
With trouble, I mean one or more of the following symptoms:

Numeric keypad not working, even with numlock enabled/disabled

Home/End keys not working as they should

Function keys not working as they should

Other weirdness concerning keyboard...

We've figured out a possible solution to the problem. It has been tested (and used) extensively by my and a collegue, and have found it working perfectly on Debian Woody and Debian Sarge.
It may be possible that these settings also work on other distros having similar problems. If it does, please let us know so we can add it to the article  ...
by lunarg on March 26th 2007, at 20:08
Apparently, there's no package for MS-SQL support in Debian or Ubuntu. Why this is, is not very known, in particular since there is MS-SQL support in PHP4 and PHP5.
I found the following steps somewhere on the internet.

The following was tested on a Ubuntu 6.10 Edgy, but will probably work on others as well.
Also, whenever I refer to php5, it could well be replaced with php4, which I've tested as well.

First of, make sure the necessary build tools are installed:
# apt-get install build-essential debhelper

It's possible more tools are needed, depending on which ones have already been installed, but basically, if you can compile other packages from source, you should be good to go.

Next up  ...
 
showing posts tagged with 'debian'