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showing posts tagged with 'exchange'
 
by lunarg on January 23rd 2017, at 11:03
In a hybrid Exchange environment, you may get an error when attempting to log in to Office 365 when performing a management task involving Office 365. When clicking the "Sign in to Office 365" link, the following error is displayed:

critical error
The web page isn't loading correctly. Please reload the page by refreshing your browser.

Technical information: Unable to set the property "mkt" of a null reference or undefined

Not really a solution, but you can work around the issue by performing these steps:

In EAC, navigate to Hybrid.

Click Modify.

Click Sign in to Office 365, type in your Office 365 username and password.

Once logged in, click on the Enterprise tab and try per  ...
by lunarg on January 23rd 2017, at 10:17

If you have the Exchange Management Tools installed, you can easily import the Exchange module into a standard Powershell by running the Add-PSSnapin cmdlet.

Depending on the Exchange version, the module to add is slightly different:

Exchange 2007Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.Admin
Exchange 2010Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.E2010
Exchange 2013Microsoft.Exchange.Management.PowerShell.SnapIn

If you're not sure about the version, you can also use wildcard characters:

Add-PSSnapin *Exchange*

If you don't want to install the management tools, you can also use PS remoting to remotely access the management shell from a standard Powershell.

by lunarg on November 18th 2016, at 14:44

When running Get-ReceiveConnector, the contents of the RemoteIPRanges field may be truncated if there are a lot of entries. You can "expand" the list:

Get-ReceiveConnector MyConnector | Select -expand RemoteIPRanges | FT

This will expand each of the IP range objects and FT makes sure it's nicely formatted in a table. For single addresses, you only need the LowerBound column, but if ranges have been specified, you probably want both columns.

by lunarg on August 10th 2016, at 15:31
It may not seem evident to find out which mailboxes are accessible by a particular user or group. Through EAC, there is no apparent way to do this, as giving access for a user to a (shared) mailbox can only be done through the shared mailbox and then providing the user/group access. There is no way to query a particular user/group and show a list of mailboxes that user/group has access to. Fortunately, it seems that Powershell (EMS) does provide an easier answer.

These cmdlets work in both Office365 and on-premise Exchange 2007 or newer.

List mailboxes to which a user/group has access to:

Get-Mailbox | Get-MailboxPermission -User user1

Although the cmdlet states a user name, replacing th  ...
by lunarg on June 30th 2016, at 13:11
When you migrated your mail from an on-premise Exchange to Office 365, and you did not (yet) uninstall Exchange and/or clean up AD, Outlook will still try to configure itself to connect to the on-premise Exchange when adding a new account, even though Autodiscover has been configured correctly (autodiscover.domain.tld pointing to autodiscover.outlook.com).

The reason for this is in the way how Outlook performs its autodiscovery attempts. The first step in the discovery process is trying to configure the account using Service Connection Point (SCP), which is defined in AD (or in rare cases, in the registry of the computer). As the SCP is still configured in AD/registry, Outlook will use thos  ...
by lunarg on June 21st 2016, at 15:31
Even when using Exchange SSL certificates that are signed by an internal CA, you will still occasionally have to renew them. Using EAC (https://your-exchange-server/ecp), this should be pretty straightforward, or is it?

After logging on to EAC, and navigating to "Servers" → "Certificates", select the expired certificate, then on the right pane, you can click "Renew" to generate a certificate signing request with all the proper SANs. This CSR can then be used with your internal CA to sign the request and generate a new certificate.

Unfortunately, you will most likely hit a snare: the CSR generated by the Exchange server does not contain any certificate tem  ...
by lunarg on May 25th 2016, at 15:59

You can quickly check which mailbox has e-mail forwarding settings enabled through the EMS:

Get-Mailbox -Filter {ForwardingAddress -ne $null} | FT Name,ForwardingAddress,DeliverToMailboxAndForward -Autosize

You can use the cmdlet above and process its output or export it to a CSV (using Export-CSV).

by lunarg on April 20th 2016, at 15:47
A few steps to enable management of your Office 365 subscription using Powershell. One uses Powershell because not all configuration is available through the Office 365 Portal, and it's also useful for automation.

UPDATE (2016-04-20): updated links and information.

Download and install the Microsoft Online Services Sign-In Assistant.This is required in order to be able to sign in to Office 365.

Download and install Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell (64-bit version).Note: 32-bit users, see below.

Optionally, you can also download and install modules to manage Sharepoint Online and Skype for Business Online.

32-bit Azure AD Module
From October 20, 2014, the Azure Ac  ...
by lunarg on October 29th 2015, at 13:07

You can easily get the Exchange version for all Exchange servers in your domain with this one-liner. Run it from an Exchange Management Shell.

Get-ExchangeServer | Select Name,AdminDisplayVersion,Edition,ServerRole

The following information is displayed:

Name : the server name
AdminDisplayVersion :
the version and build of the server
You can cross-reference this with the Exchange version matrix to find out which updates are installed.
Edition : can be Standard or Enterprise
ServerRole : the roles on the server specified by Name
by lunarg on October 29th 2015, at 13:05

These version matrix pages (from Microsoft) contain the build numbers (how to check?) of Exchange, matched against their update "names" (RU, CU numbers), their release dates, and a link to the KB containing the update download:

by lunarg on October 13th 2015, at 14:46

DigiCert has a very handy tool to automatically change the internal and external URLs of an Exchange CAS server:

https://www.digicert.com/internal-domain-name-tool.htm

by lunarg on September 17th 2015, at 16:40
Sometimes, it may be handy to know how many CALs in Exchange are now actually in use. In Exchange 2010 and 2013, this can be done very easily.

There are two types of Exchange CALs: Standard and Enterprise. For the majority, the CALs provide the same feature, accept for Enterprise, which has the following additional features:

Mailbox archiving

Per-mailbox journaling

Unified Messaging

If a mailbox uses any of these "enterprise" features, then it is treated as an Enterprise CAL. If not, it is a Standard CAL.

License compliancy
This process "calculates" the current required CALs, not the CALs you have purchased. It's up to you to determine whether you are compliant.

In  ...
by lunarg on September 15th 2015, at 15:56
Rather than installing the Exchange 2013 management tools, you could also connect to the Exchange Management Shell (EMS) through Powershell "remoting".

Connect to EMS using the current credentials (i.e. the user running Powershell):

$session = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri http://exchange-server-fqdn/PowerShell -Authentication KerberosImport-PSSession $session

Replace exchange-server-fqdn with the FQDN or IP address of the Exchange server you wish to connect to. With this command, you will be using the credentials of the current logged in user, and authenticate through Kerberos. If the user is not a organizational admin, you will be able to l  ...
by lunarg on September 11th 2015, at 10:39
This is a very crude script to defrag (using eseutil) Exchange mailbox databases.

The script takes the database name as a mandatory parameter. It then dismounts the database, checks whether the database state has been shutdown cleanly, performs the defrag, verifies the state again, and finally, mounts it again.

Note that this is an offline process. The specified mailbox database will be offline, meaning that all mailboxes in the database will not be accessible until the process has been completed.

Use with caution!
This script has not been tested extensively and does not account for everything that can go wrong. I merely provide it as a good starting point to extend the script to somethin  ...
by lunarg on September 3rd 2015, at 14:08
The internal health monitoring system may report Unhealthy, and an error similar to the following is reported by SCOM:

Alert: {2} Resolution state: New
Alert: {2}
Source: EXCH02 - Compliance
Path: EXCH02.contoso.com;EXCH02.contoso.com
Last modified by: System
Last modified time: 9/3/2015 11:43:37 AM Alert description: EMSMDB.DoRpc(Logon) step of ComplianceOutlookLogonToArchiveRpcCtpProbe/EXCHDB03 has failed against EXCH02.contoso.com proxying to Unknown for HealthMailbox8414258ad6574db1ad62eb67e94b9d6d@contoso.com.
Latency: 00:00:00.9250000
ActivityContext:
.
.
.
Details:
Error: Error returned in LogonCallResult. Error code = WrongServer (0x00000478)
Log: RpcProxy connectivity verification  ...
by lunarg on September 3rd 2015, at 10:48
When running Blackberry Enterprise Server (BES) 5.0.4 in an environment with users whose mailboxes are located on Exchange 2013 servers, you may encounter the following problem: certain, but not all users lose their connectivity on their mobile devices. They can no longer send or receive e-mail, calendar, contacts.

When looking at the event viewer, an application crash is logged:

Event 1000 Application Error
Faulting application name: BlackBerryAgent.exe, version: 5.0.4.17, time stamp: 0x502e604b
Faulting module name: exmapi32.dll, version: 6.5.8320.0, time stamp: 0x517e1c40
Exception code: 0xc0000005
Fault offset: 0x00010188
Faulting process id: 0x1fbc
Faulting application start time: 0x0  ...
by lunarg on September 2nd 2015, at 17:02
Exchange 2013 uses Managed Availability to monitor its own health. One part of this monitoring is achieved through the use of synthetic transactions, mimicking regular user activity, such as accessing mailboxes, send/receive e-mail, etc. For this to work properly, the monitoring system uses so-called Health Mailboxes. These are just regular mailboxes (with a regular AD account), but are created automatically and used for the sole purpose of health monitoring. Depending on the CU-version of Exchange 2013, these are created for every database on every CAS (or just one per CAS and one per database, starting from CU6).

Sometimes, these mailboxes may become corrupt or unusable, in which case the  ...
by lunarg on September 2nd 2015, at 16:29
If you notice that SCOM is not properly discovering services on a particular server (e.g. it does not detect the presence of Exchange), you can resolve this by clearing the cache of the agent on the server. This will trigger a new full discovery, and the agent should now be able to detect the new services:

Log on the server of which services are not discovered properly.

Stop the agent (System Center Management service): net stop HealthService



Delete the contents of the Health Service State folder, located in the installation folder of the agent.
(default location: %PROGRAMFILES%\System Center Operations Manager\Agent).

Start the agent again (System Center Management service): net start  ...
by lunarg on September 1st 2015, at 16:24
If a mailbox gets migrated or disabled (= disconnected), the mailbox is not removed from the mailbox database right away. Instead, Exchange uses the retention configuration of the mailbox database in which the mailbox was stored. This is useful if a restore of the mailbox is needed (e.g. in case of accidental deletion).

However, sometimes it may not be necessary to have the mailbox available for undelete. E.g. when you have migrated a large number of mailboxes, you may not wish to keep the old mailbox copies to free up disk space. In that case, you can manually "purge" the mailbox from the mailbox database.

Note that this only works with a disconnected mailbox. These are mailboxe  ...
by lunarg on August 28th 2015, at 10:05
Exchange mailbox database files (EDB-files) grow in size as the data within them grows. But when data is removed, their file sizes will not shrink back. Instead, the file will contain "white space", which will be re-used if additional space is needed again.

Older versions of Exchange (2007 and earlier) did (limited) automatic space reclamation as part of their online database maintenance routines. Starting from Exchange 2010, these maintenance routines have changed and space reclamation no longer occurs. It is up to the Exchange administrator to perform space reclamation if the need arises.

There are two viable methods for reclaiming disk space, each having their pros and cons:

  ...
 
showing posts tagged with 'exchange'
 
 
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