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showing posts tagged with 'mac'
 
by lunarg on January 30th 2017, at 11:33
Since Mac OSX Lion (10.7), it is possible to open a Terminal from a Finder window, similar to "Open Command Prompt" in Windows. The feature is available as a service and is by default disabled, but when enabled, it allows you to click a folder and then perform "Open Terminal", which will launch a terminal window at the specified folder.

To enable the "Open Terminal" service:

From Finder, click the Finder application menu, then under the Services menu, click Services Preferences.Alternatively, open System Preferences, click Keyboard, then Shortcuts and in the left pane, click Services.

In the right pane, scroll down to Files and Folders, and look for New Termi  ...
by lunarg on November 18th 2016, at 14:43
Now that Skype for Business 2016 for Mac is publicly available, you could get rid of the old Lync for Mac 2011. Preferably, this should be a clean uninstall. Microsoft has released KB2691870, explaining how to do this.

The uninstall is not very elaborate: dragging the Lync application to the Trash is sufficient but leaves configuration, preferences and chat history on your Mac. To get rid of those, remove the following files:

~/Library/Preferences/com.microsoft.Lync.plist

~/Library/Preferences/ByHost/MicrosoftLyncRegistrationDB.*.plist

~/Library/Logs/Microsoft-Lync*.log

Remove these folders:

~/Documents/Microsoft User Data/Microsoft Lync Data

~/Documents/Microsoft User Data/Microsoft   ...
by lunarg on July 15th 2016, at 15:28

When running an app, you may encounter the following error:

Error
Application is damaged and can't be opened.

When attempting to reinstall the app, the error persists.

To resolve, try running the following command from a terminal:

sudo xattr -rc /Applications/Application.app

Replace Application.app with the full path of the application that has the problem.

I had this problem when installing Wineskin Winery on a Mac OS X 10.8.5. A freshly downloaded copy immediately gave the error but after adjusting the attributes on the app, it worked properly.

by lunarg on June 9th 2016, at 16:31
Mac OSX creates .DS_Store files on network mapped folders to store metadata (such as position of icons, added comments on files and folders, etc.). On a local (Mac-formatted) disk, these are stored as filesystem metadata, but on network folders, this is not possible, so this data is stored in a file instead. While this file is hidden for Mac-users, Windows-users will immediately spot the file in each folder that's accessed by a Mac. The creation of these metadata files can be turned off for network shares on SMB/CIFS, AFP, NFS, and WebDAV servers.

Open a Terminal, and run the following command:

defaults write com.apple.desktopservices DSDontWriteNetworkStores true

This is a user setting s  ...
by lunarg on May 15th 2016, at 12:31
Control + Shift + Eject*Locks your Mac so you will have to unlock it with your password. Note that this will also sleep the display but the Mac will continue to run.
Command + Option + Eject*Puts the entire Mac asleep. This is the same as clicking on the Apple-icon at the left-top and choose "Sleep".

* Newer Macs: Eject = Power

To properly "lock" your Mac when using either of the shortcuts, you will have to enable Require password after sleep or screen saver begins (System Preferences → Security & Privacy). When not set to immediately, the configured delay will be used when using the shortcuts.

by lunarg on May 10th 2016, at 09:52

You can use Terminal in combination with AppleScript to set/change the wallpaper on your Mac. While not immediately obvious when you would need this, it might come in handy for automation purposes.

Open a Terminal and run the following command:

osascript -e 'tell application "Finder" to set desktop wallpaper to POSIX file "/path/to/file.jpg"'

Replace /path/to/file.jpg with the full path of the file you want to use. All common formats (JPG, PNG, etc.) are supported.

by lunarg on April 8th 2016, at 17:22
Mac OSX 10.10.4 introduces TRIM support for third party SSDs. Until then, you had to use third party tools such as Trim Enabler in order to get TRIM on your SSD.

By default, when replacing your HDD with a third party SSD (i.e. an SSD not from Apple), TRIM is still not enabled. But you can run a simple command from a Terminal which will do just that:

sudo trimforce enable

This will enable TRIM on any SSD that supports it. Note that you will have to reboot for the changes to take effect.

If you wish to disable TRIM (why on earth would you do that?), you can run the same command, replacing enable with disable.

Note that trimforce does not completely replace Trim Enabler as it only enables   ...
by lunarg on February 10th 2016, at 15:55

With the latest updates of Outlook 2011 for Mac, when opening a message, the Save As function is grayed out, so you can no longer save individual messages like that.

However, you can still drag the message from the Outlook window to your desktop or to a folder in Finder. This creates a eml file that Outlook can read later when you double-click it, and also includes all attachments of that message.

If you need an e-mail as a PDF, you can simply use OSX'es built-in "print-to-PDF" functionality.

by lunarg on December 5th 2015, at 16:24
If you want to replace an Application icon (e.g. when using Wineskin to run Windows-applications), you can do so by replacing the icon file inside an app, located at:

AppName.app/Contents/Resources/AppName.icns

However, sometimes, you will still see the old icon in Finder. This is due to the Finder icon cache, which only gets updated if certain files within the app have a new modified date. The icon file itself isn't one of them. In order to trigger Finder to update its icon cache, it is sufficient to update the modification time of two items by "touching" them from a Terminal:

touch /Applications/AppName.apptouch /Applications/AppName.app/Contents/Info.plist

Normally, this wil  ...
by lunarg on December 2nd 2015, at 21:09
Configuration settings and preferences of Mac OS X apps are usually stored in a so-called plist (Property List file) file, stored in the folder ~/Library/Preferences. These files store a list of properties in a serialized way, and are binary (not readable/editable).

Mac OS X itself has some tools to view and edit property lists but they are not very efficient and easy to use. Luckily, the internet provides all sort of (free) tools to perform the task of viewing/editing these files much more easily.

The most easy-to-use I found is Prefs Editor, written by Thomas Tempelmann.

It is a very easy to use, intuitive, and foremost, a free tool which can view and edit property lists in real-time. I  ...
by lunarg on July 8th 2015, at 16:36
By default, only processes that are run directly by root are allowed to load kexts. When a user (non-root) process tries to load a kext, an error is logged in system.log similar to:

Request from non-root process 'netbiosd' (euid 222) to load /System/Library/Extensions/smbfs.kext - not allowed.

You can resolve the issue by allowing the specific kext (e.g.: smbfs.kext) to be loaded by non-root processes. This is done by editing the Info.plist file that's included with the kext, usually at /path/to/kext-name.kext/Contents/Info.plist.

Open a Terminal.

Locate the kext and edit its Info.plist file.In our example, this would be the file: /System/Library/Extensions/smbfs.kext/Contents/Info.plist  ...
by lunarg on July 7th 2015, at 14:21

It may be useful to know whether your Mac has a 32-bit or 64-bit EFI. This can be done by running the following command from an OSX Terminal (can run from the installer or recovery partition):

ioreg -l -p IODeviceTree | grep firmware-abi

This should return something like the following:

• For 32-bit EFI:  | | "firmware-abi" = <"EFI32">
• For 64-bit EFI:  | | "firmware-abi" = <"EFI64">
by lunarg on July 7th 2015, at 12:23

MacPostFactor 1.0.1 has been officially released:

Download (direct link)

MacPostFactor is a tool to install Mac OSX 10.8+ on older (Intel) Macbooks that only support up to OSX 10.7 (Lion). It works through a combination of a highly customized installer, a replaced set of drivers and various frameworks, and the original install app from the App Store. The installation can be done directly on a Macbook already running OSX Lion (so no USB disk required), or on an USB media for installation on another system.

by lunarg on June 30th 2015, at 15:15

Recent models of Mac boot up with a black boot screen and white Apple logo, instead of the old gray and dark gray boot screen. DarkBoot enables older Mac systems to get the black boot screen as well. For newer Macs, the app can also change the boot screen back to the traditional gray color.

  1. Download latest release of DarkBoot.
  2. Unzip and run the DarkBoot app.
  3. Select the desired color, then click OK.
    You will be prompted for the admin password. Enter it and press OK.
  4. Reboot twice for changes to take effect.

Known to work with OSX 10.10 and 10.11 DP.

by lunarg on June 29th 2015, at 17:15

MacPostFactor 1.0 has been officially released:

Download (direct link)

MacPostFactor is a tool to install Mac OSX 10.8+ on older (Intel) Macbooks that only support up to OSX 10.7 (Lion). It works through a combination of a highly customized installer, a replaced set of drivers and various frameworks, and the original install app from the App Store. The installation can be done directly on a Macbook already running OSX Lion (so no USB disk required), or on an USB media for installation on another system.

by lunarg on June 29th 2015, at 11:39
MacPostfactor is a tool to install Mac OSX 10.8+ on older Macbooks that normally only support up to OSX 10.7 (Lion). It works through a combination of a highly customized installer, a replaced set of drivers and various frameworks, and the original installation app from the App Store. The installation can be done directly on a Macbook already running OSX Lion (so no USB disk required), or on an USB media for installation on another system.

You need an Intel-based Macbook capable of running OSX Lion (10.7) (otherwise your Mac is too old), but one that does not support OSX Mountain Lion (10.8) or higher. PowerPC-based Macs are not supported (they do not run OSX Lion).

The installer ap  ...
by lunarg on June 3rd 2015, at 15:09
SMB (Server Message Block) is an application protocol, most commonly used for file and printer sharing. Although it was originally designed by IBM for use in OS/2, it has been adopted and improved upon by Microsoft as the primary protocol for file and printer sharing in their Windows for Workgroup. It has been in use ever since on Windows and a myriad of other OS flavours.

Although SMB is proprietary to Microsoft, SMB is also available on linux (through Samba), Apple (first Samba, then later, Apple's own SMBX), and a myriad of other OS vendors. In fact, Apple has replaced their own AFP in favour of SMB in their latest releases of Mac OSX. SMB has become the most commonly used protocol for f  ...
by lunarg on April 27th 2015, at 10:59
Smartcard readers that use the OpenSC PCSC daemon in order to work may no longer work after upgrading your Mac OSX to Mavericks (10.9). This is because of a problem that occurs with the PCSCD after the upgrade. Affected card readers are all that use this daemon for its communication. Examples are most ACR38U-based card readers, certain Vasco DIGIPASS readers, and some others.

The solution is to re-install the PCSCD package, which will fix corruption and make sure the daemon is started properly, enabling the card reader again.

Download the PCSCD-autostart package from the Vasco website.

Install this package. Note that you may have to circumvent the built-in application security, as  ...
by lunarg on March 25th 2015, at 17:01
The iPhoto and OSX version support matrix.

iPhoto version 10.10 10.9 10.8 10.7 10.6 9.6   9.5.1   9.5     9.4.7     9.4.3   10.8.3 10.7.5   9.4   10.8.2 10.7.5   9.3.2   10.7.4   9.3   10.7.4   9.2.3   10.7.3 10.6.8 9.2.1   10.7.2 10.6.8 9.1.5     ...
by lunarg on March 25th 2015, at 16:55
If you have more than one Mac, and one of them is stuck at a certain version of iPhoto because it's no longer supported by Apple, you may have to install an older version on a newer version of OSX. OSX Lion, for instance, is restricted to version 9.4.3, so if you have another device with a newer version of OSX, you may also want to install 9.4.3 on that device, even though the App Store wants to install a newer version of iPhoto.

If you have a Time Machine backup with iPhoto 9.4.3, you could restore it from there. If not, you need the original software CD you used to install iPhoto on OSX Lion. If you do not have that either, there are other ways to get it, but this would be out of scope fo  ...
 
showing posts tagged with 'mac'
 
 
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