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by lunarg on January 29th 2016, at 10:24

When a new user logs on to a computer and they start Adobe Acrobat Standard/Pro for the first time, they will be prompted with a registration window. This may not be something you want for your users, especially not on RDS. Up until version 9, this prompt could be turned off through a registry setting, but this no longer works.

You can however also turn off the registration window through another way, during installation. Unfortunately, this requires you to uninstall and reinstall the software but the result does work perfectly.

  1. If Acrobat is already installed, uninstall it first.
  2. Open a command prompt and navigate to the installation media (or folder).
  3. Perform the installation by using msiexec, rather than setup.exe and manually add some parameters:
    msiexec /i AcroStan.msi EULA_ACCEPT=YES REGISTRATION_SUPPRESS=YES /n
    The MSI file referenced is for Acrobat Standard. Substitute the name if you're using Pro.

Note that this will install Acrobat with the default language settings. If you want to use another installer language, you will have to add an additional parameter, pointing to the correct language file (i.e. Transform file). Usually the files are in the same folder, and have the name of the numerical language identifier (click link for reference). For example, for English (US), this would be 1033.mst.

Determine the correct language identifier, then run the installer with the TRANSFORMS parameter in addition to the other parameters:

msiexec /i AcroStan.msi EULA_ACCEPT=YES REGISTRATION_SUPPRESS=YES TRANSFORMS=1033.mst /n

The command above would install the English (US) version of Acrobat Standard. Again, substitute where appropiate.
E.g. for Dutch, it would be TRANSFORMS=1043.mst.

 
 
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