by lunarg on September 27th 2018, at 11:38
It is best practice not to have an ISO mounted on a VM if it is not necessary. This is especially the case with VDI: if you forget to set the optical drive back to client, each of your desktops will have the ISO mounted as well, which can create a hassle with dependencies on the datastore where the ISO is located.

With PowerCLI, you can quickly resolve the matter with this one-liner:

Get-VM | Get-CDDrive | Where {$_.ISOPath -ne $null} | Set-CDDrive -NoMedia -Confirm:$false

For VDI, note that this will not work for replicas and master images containing snapshots, as the dependency remains intact if a snapshot exists where the ISO was still mounted. In that case, it is better to clone the m  ...
by lunarg on September 27th 2018, at 10:35

Similar as on FreeBSD and Linux, you can add/remove static network routes through the command line with the route command. The syntax somewhat differs from Linux, though.

To add a route (e.g. subnet 192.168.3.0/24 to gateway 192.168.1.254):

sudo route -n add -net 192.168.3.0/24 192.168.1.254

To remove a route:

sudo route -n delete -net 192.168.3.0/24

To show the current route table, you can use netstat:

netstat -nr
by lunarg on September 27th 2018, at 10:15
Folder view preferences are stored separately in a hidden file called .DS_Store in each folder. If you want to reset the folder view options to the default settings, you can use Terminal to do a search for those files and remove them.

To remove them in your home folder, you can run this:

find ~ -name ".DS_Store" -delete

Note that you can also do this on network shares. Just adjust the search path accordingly.

Suppose you have a share mapped to smb://server/data, then you would type:

find /Volumes/data -name "*.DS_Store" -delete

Caution
Be very careful with this command. It will not ask for confirmation!Making a typo (like forgetting to add the -name parameter) could result in permanent  ...
by lunarg on August 24th 2018, at 15:14
In case of disaster, it is usually a very good idea to periodically back up the configuration of your network switches. This article lists syntax for backing up configuration to a TFTP server for different vendors.

In the syntax examples below, the IP for the TFTP is 1.2.3.4, and we're writing to the file switch.cfg.

Note that this article is definitely not complete. If you have additions to this article, please post them in the comments.

The syntax for Dell and Cisco switches is mostly the same. For N-series and PowerConnect, a summary is displayed which needs to be confirmed, which is not the case for Cisco and Dell S-series.

For Cisco Small Business (SF- and SG-series), the CLI ne  ...
by lunarg on August 21st 2018, at 14:44

Cisco's SF/SG 300/500 series managed switches have CLI access via Telnet and SSH but this is turned off by default, leaving only the web interface to manage the switch. You can enable Telnet and/or SSH via the web interface, enabling management via CLI.

  1. Log on to the web interface, then navigate to Security → TCP/UDP Services.
  2. Check the Enable boxes for Telnet Service and/or SSH Service. You can check both if you wish to enable both protocols. Click Apply, which will immediately start the selected services:
  3. Don't forget to save the configuration change to flash. Otherwise, the change will be lost after a reboot:
by lunarg on August 21st 2018, at 14:16
When installing tftpd-hpa, as a security measure, the service does not allow uploading new files. It does allow overwriting existing files, provided that the permissions are set correctly (as expected). The idea behind this is to secure TFTP a bit by only allowing uploads if the file already exists (and is writable). But this can be very tedious in some cases, where a lot of files have to be uploaded, and it is not possible to guess the names to create them in advance.

It is possible to configure tftpd-hpa to allow the creation of new files by adding the -c or --create parameter when starting the daemon.

For Ubuntu and Debian, this means editing the file /etc/default/tftpd-hpa, and adding   ...
by lunarg on August 21st 2018, at 11:20
To enable SSH on Dell Networking N-series (formerly known as Dell PowerConnect), you first have to generate the required private RSA and DSA keys. If you don't, you're met with a very secretive error message:

SSH could not be enabled.

To generate the keys, and configure and enable SSH, log on to the switch using the console cable or log on through Telnet:

Go into EXEC mode, then in CONFIG mode:

enableconfigure

Generate both the RSA and DSA keys:

crypto key generate rsacrypto key generate dsa

Now, you can enable the SSH server:

ip ssh server

Optionally: you can also change the default listen port:

ip ssh port 22

With more recent firmware versions, you are no longer able to   ...
by lunarg on August 16th 2018, at 10:13
MacPostfactor is a tool to install Mac OSX 10.8+ on older Macbooks that normally only support up to OSX 10.7 (Lion). It works through a combination of a highly customized installer, a replaced set of drivers and various frameworks, and the original installation app from the App Store. The installation can be done directly on a Macbook already running OSX Lion (so no USB disk required), or on an USB media for installation on another system.

You need an Intel-based Macbook capable of running OSX Lion (10.7) (otherwise your Mac is too old), but one that does not support OSX Mountain Lion (10.8) or higher. PowerPC-based Macs are not supported (they do not run OSX Lion).

The installer app of th  ...
 
 
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