by lunarg on October 11th 2019, at 13:55

Not straightforward to find on the website (but with a little bit of Googling, here it is): an overview of the system requirements for VMware Fusion. All versions are listed:

https://kb.vmware.com/s/article/2005196

by lunarg on October 9th 2019, at 15:19

A very nice article explaining how to migrate from an external Platform Service Controller to an embedded one:

https://blogs.vmware.com/vsphere/2019/02/understanding-the-vcenter-server-converge-tool.html

A note about versioning: use the same version of the converge tool as the version of your vCenter and PSC. Otherwise the converge will most likely fail (as it did when using 6.7 tool on a 6.5 environment).

by lunarg on October 8th 2019, at 14:08

To get rid of Microsoft AutoUpdate on Mac, remove these files and folders:

In the System Library (you need "sudo"):

/Library/Application Support/Microsoft/MAU2.0

In your user's Library (needs to be done for each user):

~/Library/Preferences/com.microsoft.autoupdate2.plist
~/Library/Preferences/com.microsoft.autoupdate.fba.plist
~/Library/Application Support/Microsoft AU Daemon
~/Library/Application Support/Microsoft Update Assistant
~/Library/Saved Application State/com.microsoft.autoupdate2.savedState

Depending on the version (2011 or 2016/O365), you may miss one or more of these files and folders.

by lunarg on September 26th 2019, at 12:11
Check_MK, standalone or as part of OMD (The Open Monitoring Distribution), has built-in support for monitoring AeroHive wireless infrastructure through a Hive Manager. It uses the on-premise Hive Manager in order to collect information from devices registered to the Hive Manager.

Note for HMOL users
Because the agent uses the Hive Manager API, HMOL environments are not supported, as they do not allow the HM API to be enabled.

By default, HM API is turned off. Log on to the Hive Manager using an admin account. Go to:

Home → Administration → HiveManager Settings

Scroll down to API Authorization Settings, then click Settings.

Check Enable API Access, and type in a username, and t  ...
by lunarg on September 24th 2019, at 16:37

You can use Powershell to get the block size of a Windows NTFS volume:

On newer systems:

Get-CimInstance -ClassName Win32_Volume | Select DriveLetter,Label, BlockSize | FT -AutoSize

On older systems, the Get-CimInstance may not be available, in which case you can use the (deprecated) Get-WmiObject:

Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_Volume | Select DriveLetter,Label, BlockSize | FT -AutoSize
by lunarg on September 18th 2019, at 12:02
When adding a new disk to a live system (e.g. a linux VM), the new disk may not always show up. Additionally, when resizing a disk through the hypervisor, the VM may not always immediately have the new size available for use. Luckily, you can trigger a rescan of the SCSI bus through the sysfs system.

For this to work, you'll need to have shell and root access to the server/VM.

Modern linux kernels automatically detect the addition of a disk, but in case it doesn't, you can trigger a rescan of a specific (virtual) SCSI controller:

echo "- - -" > /sys/class/scsi_host/hostX/scan

Replace hostX with the number of the SCSI controller, where host0 is the first, host1 is the second, et  ...
by lunarg on September 13th 2019, at 10:55
To quickly block traffic from/to a specific IPv4 address using iptables, you can use the commands below.

Warning!
Do not use these commands when you are already running an iptables-based firewall as this may result in unexpected results.

Block incoming traffic from a specific IP:

iptables -A INPUT -s 1.2.3.4 -j DROP

Block outgoing traffic (i.e. traffic initiated from the host itself) to a specific IP:

iptables -A OUTPUT -d 1.2.3.4 -j DROP

To block outgoing traffic to a specific port and protocol, you can also do something like this (the example below blocks DNS and HTTP):

/sbin/iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp --dport 80 -d 1.2.3.4 -j DROP/sbin/iptables -A OUTPUT -p udp --dport 53 -d 1.2.3.4  ...
by lunarg on September 9th 2019, at 16:54
On VCSA, the database is stored on a separate disk. It could happen that this disk runs out of room, causing Vcenter to no longer function properly. One way to resolve this is by running database clean up as mentioned in KB 2110031. However, if this is not possible, or you don't want to clear out the data, you can also resize the disk.

For this to work, you'll need root access and access to the bash-shell, either on the console or through SSH.

Before resizing, identify the physical disk to be resized. For VCSA 6.5 and 6.7, this should normally be Disk 8 (device node in linux = /dev/sdh), but your setup may vary, so it's best to double-check this.

In VCSA 6.5 and 6.7, the database is locat  ...
 
 
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