Comments
 
posted on January 31st 2017, at 15:55
by lunarg
When using credentials in Powershell, you usually use Get-Credential, which essentially creates PSCredential objects. Creating such an object prompts the user to enter a username and password, which is not really usable in unattended scripts. There's a method where you can specify an unencrypted password but this is not secure. Fortunately, there's also a method where you can store the encrypted password in a file and use it to set the password.

To create a password file, run this from a Powershell window:

Read-Host -AsSecureString | ConvertFrom-SecureString | Out-File path-to-file

You will not get a real prompt: simply type the password will show * in the console. Type the password twice  ...
 
 
« November 2020»
SunMonTueWedThuFriSat
1234567
891011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930     
 
Links
 
Quote
« Debating Windows vs. Linux vs. Mac is pointless: they all have their merits and flaws, and it ultimately comes to down to personal preference. »
Me