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showing posts tagged with 'wireless'
 
by lunarg on May 8th 2015, at 13:16

If your Samsung Galaxy S5 may not find or be able to connect to a specific 5Ghz wireless network, you may want to check which channel the network is operating on. The S5 has problems when trying to connect to DFS-channels (Dynamic Frequency Selection).

DFS-channels are basically every channel from channel 52 and up. Try setting your AP to a channel between 36-48 (inc.), and then try reconnecting your S5.

by lunarg on January 19th 2015, at 09:01

There are two online training resources available for Aerohive:

by lunarg on June 25th 2014, at 14:10

A very interesting read about Wi-Fi implementations and its pitfalls in larger deployments, in particular about the usage of channels and the importance of channel plans.

http://blogs.aerohive.com/blog/the-wireless-lan-training-blog/wifi-back-to-basics-24-ghz-channel-planning

by lunarg on July 6th 2012, at 11:49
At a client running a Trapeze/Juniper network with some MX-8 controllers, a bunch of MP-371B and an instance of Ringmaster software to control and configure it all, we were working on implementing MAC-address based authentication for one of their ESSIDs. After correctly setting up the necessary policies, and AAA servers, we noticed that any client could still connect to our network, despite all settings being correct.

Baffled at this, we started to look around, trying to figure out what went wrong. My collegue finally remembered the true cause for our problem, a setting in the Wireless Service Profile.

There, the Fall Through Access was set to last resort, which basically tells the network  ...
by lunarg on January 27th 2010, at 11:28
In Windows, it is possible to obtain the MAC address of the wireless access point you're connected to. This is handy when you have multiple access points with the same ESSID (i.e. "roaming") and want to know which one you're connected to. This is done with the netsh CLI tool, available since Windows XP.

To do this, start a command prompt, and type in:

netsh wlan show interfaces

This shows all wireless interfaces on your system. When your wireless is active and connected to an AP, you get output similar to this:

Name : Wireless Network Connection Description : Intel(R) WiFi Link 5100 AGN GUID : f5ad6606-3b9d-41b  ...
 
showing posts tagged with 'wireless'
 
 
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