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showing posts tagged with 'vmware'
 
by lunarg on April 3rd 2013, at 10:15
Currently, vCenter Server 5.1 is not supported on Windows Server 2012. Trying to install usually results in several errors, but they can be resolved with some workarounds and things to consider. This post is a gathering of (some of) those things.

First of, be sure to install .NET 3.5 using the Server Manager. It can be found as a feature. The installation delivered in the vCenter installation cannot be installed.

It's best to install the required components (SSO and Inventory Service) separately to ensure the installation of the different components goes smoothly. You will have to type in and remember the SSO passwords though.

Upon installation of the vCenter Server, it will insta  ...
by lunarg on March 19th 2013, at 14:29
If a host cannot be managed via vCenter or from vSphere client, you can still use the CLI (on the host itself or via network using SSH or vSphere CLI/RCLI) to partially manage the VMs on the host.

For this to work you must have already enabled the local console, Tech Support Mode and/or SSH access:

Enabling root SSH login on an ESX host (8375637)

Tech Support Mode for Emergency Support (1003677) (ESXi 3.5 and 4.0 only)

Using Tech Support Mode in ESXi 4.1 and ESXi 5.0 (1017910)

Once logged in, you can use these commands to control the VMs. Note that there are differences between ESX and ESXi.

table.score th { border-left: 1px solid #094269;}table.score th.first { border-left: none} tabl  ...
by lunarg on February 13th 2013, at 16:41
After upgrading ESXi to 5.1 on an USB device, you may get a warning message stating that the system logs are stored on non-persistent storage.



Since version 5.1, system logs are kept on the default scrap partition. If it's not specified, it defaults to ramdisk, which is non-persistent; upon rebooting, the system logs will be cleared.

To resolve the issue, you can manually specify a location for the logs to be stored. This can be any configured datastore (VMFS or NFS). To configure this, go to the configuration of your ESXi host, Software, Advanced Settings.



In the tree on your left, find the Syslog, global configuration section and enter a datastore name in the field Syslog.global.log  ...
by lunarg on November 14th 2011, at 15:29
If you're running RDS on a vSphere server with VMware Tools installed, you may have noticed the evergrowing presence of vmwaretray DMP files in the user profiles. These are crash dumps from the VMware Tray icon, which is ran during every session.

The reason for this crash dump is an error which is caused by lack of read access to a certain key in the Windows registry by your regular (domain) users.

This key is called HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Software\VMWare. Inc.\VMWare Tools.

Set the permissions on that key to read access for the users logging on to the server, and your problem should go away.

Hint: you may also wish to remove the icon altogether. This is done by setting a certain registry va  ...
by lunarg on November 14th 2011, at 15:28

If you're running RDS on a vSphere server with VMware Tools installed, you may wish to remove/hide the system tray icon. This can be done by setting a certain registry value.

The registry value is:

  • Key: HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\VMware, Inc.\VMware Tools
  • Value: ShowTray

Change the value to 0 will effectively disable the icon the next time a user logs on.

by lunarg on April 4th 2011, at 15:51
With the installation of VMware ESXi 4, data stores will automatically be created using the default settings. This includes a block size of 1 MB. If you don't want that, you could delete the empty datastore and create a new one.

Sometimes, deleting the empty datastore fails with the message:

Quote
Call "HostDatastoreSystem.RemoveDatastore" for object "ha-datastoresystem" on ESXi "xx.xx.xx.xx" failed.

VMware's KB 1017104 provides the solution for another problem, but this works just as well with this issue, with a little variation.

Notice
Performing the steps in this solution will totally utterly destroy your data store. Do not use it if there's still any req  ...
by lunarg on March 7th 2011, at 15:22

In VMware ESXi 4.1, by default, the video drivers are not correctly installed. This is because of the fact that the old driver (which is installed by default) is a WDM type of driver. This type of driver has been kicked out of Windows 7 and Windows 2008R2 in favour of the newer WDDM driver architecture. As a result, the video is reverted to the Standard VGA adapter, which has terrible performance.

However, installing the VMware Tools does provide a correct driver, even though it is not installed by default. To install it, see the second chapter of the article: Windows 2008 R2 console freezes in vSphere console.

by lunarg on October 15th 2010, at 11:54
At work, I'm currently deploying a Windows 2008 R2 on a VMware ESXi 4.0, and noticed an odd behaviour. At irregular intervals, the console of the guest OS simply locks up and doesn't do anything anymore. Networking and remote access seem to work fine, it's just the console that is freezed. Restarting the vSphere client doesn't help, and the only way to get rid of the problem is by hard-resetting the VM. The issue only occurs on Windows 2008 R2, the other VMs run fine.

The problem is caused by the VMware SVGA II driver, and has two underlying issues: the driver itself, and an apparent lack of video RAM (due to the new HW-accelerated GDI of 2008R2/Win7).

The most quickest way is to get rid o  ...
by lunarg on September 13th 2010, at 15:05

It is not possible to convert disk files from thick to thin, in-place. Instead, cloning the disk (or machine) allows you to change the provisioning type and thus enabling to have a thin disk. After the clone is complete, delete the original and you're good to go.

You can either clone a complete machine, or just clone a disk using the CLI or service console:

vmkfstools -i <srcDisk.vmdk> -d thin <dstDisk.vmdk>
 
showing posts tagged with 'vmware'