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showing posts tagged with 'office365'
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by lunarg on October 21st 2014, at 11:14
You can easily get a list of users and their assigned Office365 licenses through the Windows Azure Active Directory Module for PowerShell.

Connect to your Office365 tenant through a user with Administrator permissions:

Connect-MsolService

Then, enter this command:

Get-MsolUser | Select DisplayName,Licenses | FT

You can also append the following to export it to a CSV-file.

... | Export-CSV -Delimiter ";" ~Desktopmy-export.csv

The Licenses column tells which license is assigned, but it uses different names than what is visible at the WebPortal.

These are the ones that I know of:

STANDARDPACK Office365 Enterprise E1 ENTERPRISEPACK Office  ...
by lunarg on August 28th 2014, at 13:11
For migrations from other e-mail platforms to Exchange, you probably want to have full access enabled for a certain Exchange-account to facilitate the migration without having to set up complex access rights. Exchange has something called application impersonation, which allows a user to impersonate other users to access individual mailboxes, which comes in very handy during a migration.

In order to set up application impersonation, you need access to the Exchange Management Shell (EMS), with an account which has permissions to set up access rights.

Exchange 2007 does not support application impersonation as in Exchange 2010 and up. Impersonation does exist but has to be set on each indivi  ...
by lunarg on March 4th 2014, at 13:03
In normal circumstances, Outlook would configure itself using a procedure called Autodiscovery: all server settings and logon names would be configured by downloading configuration settings from a certain site, eliminating the requirement to know any server settings. Office 365 also makes extensive use of Autodiscovery for this and other purposes. In case of migrations, or when Autodiscovery is not available or does not apply (e.g. Outlook 2007), you can also manually configure your Office 365 account. Although this used to be pretty straight-forward, since they moved to Exchange 2013, manual configuration of Outlook has become a bit more complex.

Since its upgrade to Exchange 2013, Office   ...
by lunarg on March 14th 2013, at 09:11

When you've recently changed your password, you will continuously be prompted to type in your password everytime you want to sync, and you don't see an option to always be signed in.

To resolve, you have to select to sign in as a different user, then re-enter your credentials. Signing in as a different user will show the checkbox to enable always be signed in. This method won't affect your synced data.

by lunarg on March 5th 2013, at 16:11

You can disable the password expiration for one or more users through Powershell.

$cred = Get-Credential

Connect-MSOLService -credential $cred

Get-MSOLUser | Set-MsolUser -PasswordNeverExpires $true

Note that you need to have the Microsoft Online cmdlets: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj151805.aspx

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showing posts tagged with 'office365'